iPhone 7 Battery Replacement

iphone 7 battery replacement articleThe new and improved Apple iPhone 7, released in early September, delivered all of the bells and whistles that users expect the latest model to have. With new improvements to the camera, onboard storage space, users were most excited about the promised increased battery life. But as with most new technology, users have gotten a feel for the iPhone 7’s strengths and weaknesses, one major weakness being the battery life.

Luckily for the iPhone 7’s earliest adopters, iPhone 7 battery replacement is a very feasible option for improving the battery life of your new gadget or helping fix a faulty or dead battery that just no longer seems to hold a charge.

About iPhone 7 Battery Life

Apple promises that the iPhone 7 has up to 2 hours longer battery life than the iPhone 6S. This includes up to 14 hours of 3G talk time, 10 days of standby, 12 hours of internet use on both 3G and LTE, 14 hours of internet use on Wi-Fi, 13 hours of video playback or 40 hours of audio playback.

With all these promises, users expect a powerful phone that can provide them all the charge they needed for a full day of phone usage. But it seems like these promises of improved battery life have had mixed reviews which some reports saying it has the best battery life for a cell phone on the market and some saying it has the worst.

Of course, the usual quick fixes for extending battery life can provide some easy solutions for users finding their phone’s battery dying.

iphone 7 low battery imageQuick Fixes to Help with iPhone 7 Battery Life

Users experiencing what seems like a shorter battery life can try the following to remedy it:

  • Checking for apps that are using a lot of the power supply by going to Settings > Battery > Battery Usage and scrolling through the app list to find the potential battery draining culprit.
  • Turning down your screen brightness;
  • Setting Auto-Lock to 1 minute;
  • Using headphones instead of the speaker;
  • Taking advantage of low-power mode when you need it;
  • Hiding the Clock app in a folder (that little animation can drain some power you may be missing).

If none of these solutions seem to be helping with your battery life, there is always the option of replacing the battery.

iPhone 7 Battery Replacement Costs

Replacing a phone battery can be a stressful and frustrating experience, but we are here to help and show you all the options you have.

Official Apple Store

If your device is still under its limited warranty or you bought AppleCare+, your battery replacement won’t cost you anything; however, keep in mind that your iPhone 7 is only eligible for battery replacement if it retains less than 80% of its original charge capacity. Not sure if you’re covered? Just go the AppleCare+ page on Apple.com and enter the serial number of your iPhone 7.

CPR Cell Phone Repair

Thankfully, there is another option for repairing your iPhone 7. CPR Cell Phone Repair has quick and professional service to ensure that your iPhone 7 battery replacement goes smoothly. CPR offers free estimates so you know exactly what the cost is before you buy and we offer low prices and a lifetime limited warranty on all the work we do. With our expert technicians who only use the highest quality tools and replacement equipment, your iPhone 7 battery will be replaced and you will be on your way in no time.

Other Service Providers

Other repair services, like Batteries + Bulbs, offer iPhone 7 battery replacement, but they only offer estimates and evaluation in store and their warranty only lasts 6 months.

How to Replace an iPhone 7 Battery: DIY Guide

If you want to go the DIY route and try iPhone 7 battery replacement yourself, we have this handy step-by-step guide to help. As a note: keep in mind that this is a moderately difficult process and could take anywhere from 30 minutes to over two hours depending on your experience level.

  1. Fully turn off the iPhone 7
  2. Locate the two 3.4 mm pentalobe screws that are located in the iPhone along the edges.
  3. Softening the adhesive with a hairdryer or a heat gun which will allow you to remove the display.
    1. Some guides recommend using a device called the iOpener to make this process easier.
  4. On the display’s bottom a little bit above the home button, put a place a suction cup.
  5. Create a little gap between the case and display by gently pulling up on the cup.
  6. Put the flat edge of a probe into the gap you created.
    1. The adhesive that holds the display is incredibly strong, so if you have some issues creating the gap, gently move the screen down and up to loosen the adhesive.
  7. Slide the probe up from the lower left edge of the iPhone and gently twist to increase the gap between the case and display.
  8. Next, slowly slide the probe along the iPhone’s left side moving from the lower left corner and moving towards the silent switch and volume buttons.
  9. Take out the probe and place the edge into the phone’s bottom right edge.
  10. Twist the probe to increase the gap you created in-between the case and display.
  11. Slide the probe up and to the iPhone’s right side to remove the adhesive that holds the display.
  12. Pull on the suction cup that you placed on the display in an upward direction in order to take off the display and open the device
    1. Keep in mind to not open the screen more than 10 degrees since there are cables running up the right edge that connect the logic borad to the display.
  13. Take the suction cup off the display.
  14. Slide a pick, opening picks work well, around the edge of the top of the device, in between the front panel and case, which will break up any leftover adhesive.
  15. Carefully pull away the top edge of the display to disconnect the clips that hold the case together.
    1. Open the left side of the device display and keep in mind that you should not completely separate the display.
  16. From the lower connector, take out the three 1.2mm tri-point screws and one 2.4mm screws. Note: You will need a special bit in order to properly remove the tri-point screws.
  17. Use the probe to raise the connector of the battery from its logic board socket.
  18. Use the probe’s edge to disengage both lower display connectors by moving them up and away from the logic board sockets.
  19. Take out the two 1.3 mm Phillips screws that secure the bracket over the sensor of the front panel and then take out the bracket.
  20. Disengage the this from the logic board socket.
  21. Take off the display and both 1.9 mm Phillips screws that secure the barometric vent.
  22. Take out the vent.
  23. Use a probe’s flat edge to remove the Taptic Engine connector.
  24. Take out the three 1.6 mm Phillips screws that secure the Taptic Engine.
  25. Take out the Taptic Engine.
  26. Use tweezers to remove the two strips of adhesive on the bottom of the iPhone battery.
    1. Make sure that you are keeping the strips flat to prevent any breakage or wrinkling.
  27. Carefully pull the first battery adhesive tab away towards the bottom of the device.
  28. Pull carefully and ensure you keep consistent tension until the adhesive strip pulls out from under the battery.
  29. Repeat this process on the other strip and gently secure the battery in place with a finger to make sure it stays in place.
  30. If the strips broke before you removed them, you will have to gently pull the battery away from the case using a probe.
    1. Soften the adhesive with a hairdryer or heat gun and gently pry out the battery out from the bottom left side with a thin plastic card.
  31. Remove the battery.
  32. To reassemble, follow these directions in reverse order.

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